Friday, October 20

Chemtrails are Coal Ash



Watch the video on Youtube and take note of what is written in the description.
During the World Cup and the Olympiads in Brazil I noticed that the sky had more chemtrails than the usual.
This is anecdote evidence which is good for nothing. They deny that chemtrails exist so nothing was reported about it.
Go figure what these people have in mind. I don't understand but they have a lot of pleasure making people sick and enslaving those who are not their relatives. And money, of course.



Thursday, October 19

Mona Lisa parodies

A quick "Mona Lisa" search on Google will show numerous Gioconda's parodies.
I did chose this one because I believe that the sister is tired and bored of not producing anything.
I believe she will portray Leonardo, da Vinci not di Caprio, but I have not idea if it will be in a thankful or in a revengeful way.
What do you think?

Wednesday, October 18

The Real Reasons Trump is Quitting UNESCO: Palestine

The Real Reasons Trump is Quitting UNESCO
by Jonathan Cook
October 17, 2017
Nazareth.
Counterpunch

At first glance, the decision last week by the Trump administration, followed immediately by Israel, to quit the United Nation’s cultural agency seems strange. Why penalise a body that promotes clean water, literacy, heritage preservation and women’s rights?

Washington’s claim that the UN’s Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (Unesco) is biased against Israel obscures the real crimes the agency has committed in US eyes.

The first is that in 2011 Unesco became the first UN agency to accept Palestine as a member. That set the Palestinians on the path to upgrading their status at the General Assembly a year later.

It should be recalled that in 1993, as Israel and the Palestinians signed the Oslo accords on the White House lawn, the watching world assumed the aim was to create a Palestinian state.

But it seems most US politicians never received that memo. Under pressure from Israel’s powerful lobbyists, the US Congress hurriedly passed legislation to pre-empt the peace process. One such law compels the United States to cancel funding to any UN body that admits the Palestinians.

Six years on, the US is $550 million in arrears and without voting rights at Unesco. Its departure is little more than a formality.

The agency’s second crime relates to its role selecting world heritage sites. That power has proved more than an irritant to Israel and the US.

The occupied territories, supposedly the locus of a future Palestinian state, are packed with such sites. Hellenistic, Roman, Jewish, Christian and Muslim relics promise not only the economic rewards of tourism but also the chance to control the historic narrative.

Israeli archaeologists, effectively the occupation’s scientific wing, are chiefly interested in excavating, preserving and highlighting Jewish layers of the Holy Land’s past. Those ties have then been used to justify driving out Palestinians and building Jewish settlements.

Unesco, by contrast, values all of the region’s heritage, and aims to protect the rights of living Palestinians, not just the ruins of long-dead civilisations.

Nowhere has the difference in agendas proved starker than in occupied Hebron, where tens of thousands of Palestinians live under the boot of a few hundred Jewish settlers and the soldiers who watch over them. In July, Unesco enraged Israel and the US by listing Hebron as one of a handful of world heritage sites “in danger”. Israel called the resolution “fake history”.

The third crime is the priority Unesco gives to the Palestinian names of heritage sites under belligerent occupation.

Much hangs on how sites are identified, as Israel understands. Names influence the collective memory, giving meaning and significance to places.

The Israeli historian Ilan Pappe has coined the term “memoricide” for Israel’s erasure of most traces of the Palestinians’ past after it dispossessed them of four-fifths of their homeland in 1948 – what Palestinians term their Nakba, or Catastrophe.

Israel did more than just raze 500 Palestinian towns and villages. In their place it planted new Jewish communities with Hebracaised names intended to usurp the former Arabic names. Saffuriya became Tzipori; Hittin was supplanted by Hittim; Muyjadil was transformed into Migdal.

A similar process of what Israel calls “Judaisation” is under way in the occupied territories. The settlers of Beitar Ilit threaten the Palestinians of Battir. Nearby, the Palestinians of Sussiya have been dislodged by a Jewish settlement of exactly the same name.

The stakes are highest in Jerusalem. The vast Western Wall plaza below Al Aqsa mosque was created in 1967 after more than 1,000 Palestinians were evicted and their quarter demolished. Millions of visitors each year amble across the plaza, oblivious to this act of ethnic cleansing.

Settlers, aided by the Israeli state, continue to encircle Christian and Muslim sites in the hope of taking them over.

That is the context for recent Unesco reports highlighting the threats to Jerusalem’s Old City, including Israel’s denial for most Palestinians of the right to worship at Al Aqsa.

Israel has lobbied to have Jerusalem removed from the list of endangered heritage sites. Alongside the US, it has whipped up a frenzy of moral outrage, berating Unesco for failing to prioritise the Hebrew names used by the occupation authorities.

Unesco’s responsibility, however, is not to safeguard the occupation or bolster Israel’s efforts at Judaisation. It is there to uphold international law and prevent Palestinians from being disappeared by Israel. (emphasis mine)

Trump’s decision to quit Unesco is far from his alone. His predecessors have been scuffling with the agency since the 1970s, often over its refusal to cave in to Israeli pressure.

Now, Washington has a pressing additional reason to punish Unesco for allowing Palestine to become a member. It needs to make an example of the cultural body to dissuade other agencies from following suit.

Trump’s confected indignation at Unesco, and his shrugging off of its vital global programmes, serve as a reminder that the US is not an “honest broker” of a Middle East peace. Rather it is the biggest obstacle to its realisation.

A version of this article first appeared in the National, Abu Dhabi.


Sunday, October 15

It rules the world and makes 100% of humanity slaves

The oligarchs can't get enough and wont lose a single cent. They kill, destroy countries, promote genocides everywhere. All these crimes committed because of this abstraction: money that is made out of thin air and has not connection with a real value in itself neither with gold or even the oil.

The world is falling apart. Still they keep going enslaving those who are not their relatives without noticing that they themselves are slaves of this nothingness.

Two sides of the same coin. The world is becoming less and less human in numerous scales. Eugenics, transhumanism, robots, in short, simulacrum. Microchips implants.
They praise everything that is far from human beings as known.
Maybe it is too late for a new humanism. 

The irony is that they see themselves as models, more humans than the whole humanity.
They have a long life even if it takes implanting five hearts taken from the humans they despise, the degenerated. 
Don't look at them for they transform everything in stone.  





Saturday, October 14

Fashion according to Oscar Wilde


Dedicated to the fashion victims. 
Have a great Saturday!
Update:
I just found this on Facebook:






Friday, October 13

Rocky Palermo Las Vegas victim: “There Was 100% More Than One Shooter,”



This is an interview done for The Blast

"He is skeptical of the information being given by authorities regarding Stephen Paddock being a “lone wolf” gunman and has a theory as to why cops don’t buy it.

Further, Palermo is questioning why certain exits out of the venue were suddenly closed off just before the shooting, but claims the same exits were open during the previous nights of the concert." Read the entire article.

We just want the truth.



Thursday, October 12

Silly is beautiful

I was on the verge of posting something today but I realized that I didn't want to talk about anything serious, heinous or sad today.
The word "silly" came to my mind but I'm too tired or lazy to think about something.
So I searched for "silly" here
Word of the say: "silly".


Wednesday, October 11

The four dogs

The first on the left is thinking that it is better to mind his own business but his brothers will sure snoop around and pay attention to everything others a doing.

The series "The Four Dogs" ended in 2012 but I couldn't refrain from posting these Akita puppies.
Image: here.


Monday, October 9

Sane Progressive banned from Youtube: It affects all of us


To Debbie and all of those who are being censored.


YouTube and Facebook are banning people who dissent



I just woke up and came across with this news: Sane Progressive can no longer  live stream on Youtube for she was banned.  The videos about Las Vegas shootings were deleted.
It is not only Debbie's Sane Progressive channel. Other people are receiving the same treatment.
I don't even know what to say. Everyday there is something incredible serious happening in this world. It goes beyond 1984.
Please, if you care listen to Debbie and try to fight as you can. We are all under fire.




Sunday, October 8

Saturday, October 7

Anti-surveillance masks to protect your identity


URME SURVEILLANCE: Indiegogo Campaign from Leo Selvaggio on Vimeo.

Anti-surveillance mask lets you pass as someone else
By Leslie Katz
May 8, 2014

Uncomfortable with surveillance cameras? "Identity replacement tech" in the form of the Personal Surveillance Identity Prosthetic gives you a whole new face.

If the world starts looking like a scene from "Matrix 3" where everyone has Agent Smith's face, you can thank Leo Selvaggio.

His rubber mask aimed at foiling surveillance cameras features his visage, and if he has his way, plenty of people will be sporting the Personal Surveillance Identity Prosthetic in public. It's one of three products made by the Chicago-based artist's URME Surveillance, a venture dedicated to "protecting the public from surveillance and creating a safe space to explore our digital identities."

"Our world is becoming increasingly surveilled. For example, Chicago has over 25,000 cameras networked to a single facial recognition hub," reads the URME (pronounced U R Me) site. "We don't believe you should be tracked just because you want to walk outside and you shouldn't have to hide either. Instead, use one of our products to present an alternative identity when in public."

The 3D-printed resin mask, made from a 3D scan of Selvaggio's face and manufactured by ThatsMyFace.com, renders his features and skin tone with surprising realism, though the eyes peeping out from the eye holes do lend a certain creepiness to the look.

Creepiness is, of course, part of the point here, as the interdisciplinary artist takes a his-face-in-everyone's-face approach to exploring the impact of an increasingly networked world on personal identity.

"When you wear these devices the cameras will track me instead of you and your actions in public space will be attributed as mine because it will be me the cameras see," the artist, who's working toward his MFA at Chicago's Columbia College, says on a recently launched Indiegogo page for the products. "All URME devices have been tested for facial recognition and each properly identifies the wearer of me on Facebook, which has some of the most sophisticated facial recognition software around."

It turns out some states have anti-mask laws. And Selvaggio -- whose earlier project You Are Me let others use his social-media profiles -- says he's considered the possibility that anyone wearing his face in public could engage in illegal activity.



Friday, October 6

Lipstick: 50 shades of red and Anish Kapoor






I can't get enough of red lipstick. Sometimes I try a pink or another colour but it doesn't look nice.I thought it was my perception so I asked some friends and they agree with me that red is the best colour for me. 
One of the shades I like the most is the one that has a touch of blue. Yes, there are red colours with a bit of blue that enhances the colour. It is being difficult to find this colour at the moment.
The image above I took from Pinterest. I thought about this post and I decided that the title would be  "50 shade of red", how original. I did google it and there it was: this picture that makes me feel like eating the colours.

Some month agoI watched a documentary with Anish Kapoor, who speaks about his art in a way that captivates, and he talked about the red colour. 
In his exhibition "My Red Homeland", a monumental installation being composed of 25 tons of red, Kapoor talked to Raúl Martínez Fernández and he said:

"“I have always thought of the colour red as a colour of the centre, like a path to emotional exploration”. Red is the colour of blood, of passion and emotion; red is the colour of meat, here turned into wax and Vaseline – organic but imperishable. The red colour is thus more than just a simple connection between the works that have shaped this exhibition – furthermore, it assumes a fundamental role in the sculptures of Anish Kapoor, one of the most important sculptors of contemporary art. From his first sculptures – simple geometrical or biomorphic forms coated in pigments – to his latest work formed from metal, wax and Vaseline in which the monochromatic effect creates a never-ending optical illusion, the application of colour indicates a constant in his works: the search for Immateriality and Spirituality."

Courtesy: CAC Málaga & Lisson Gallery


Thursday, October 5

US needs a basic income due to the 'death of work' from automation



David Simon, creator of the popular HBO series "The Wire," and most recently "The Deuce," has voiced his support for a system of wealth distribution known as universal basic income, in which every citizen receives a regular sum of money just for being alive.
"I think we've reached the point in terms of the death of work, and where we're going in society and automation, that we should already be guaranteeing people a basic income," Simon recently told New Yorker editor David Remnick on The New Yorker Radio Hour podcast.
Simon's body of work, which includes news articles, books, and TV shows, has focused extensively on the nature of American labor. "The Wire" centered on the drug trade in Baltimore, Maryland in the early 2000s. "The Deuce," currently in its first season, explores prostitution in New York City in the early 1970s.
In his podcast interview, Simon pointed to the threat of robotic automation as grounds for implementing basic income. Economists have issued numerous forecasts that predict huge swaths of the American workforce, perhaps as much as 50%, could lose their job over the next 20 years to highly intelligent software and factory robots.
Advocates of basic income say redistributing the wealth produced by those efficient systems — in effect, something akin to a dividend — would give people the means to avoid menial work and still live above the poverty line.
Basic income would be "an incredible boon to the country, and it would honestly take into account that we don't need as many Americans to run this economy as we once did," Simon said.
Critics of basic income tend to voice two big concerns about the system: that giving people free money will sap the drive to work out of potential employees, and that people (especially those in poverty) will spend the money on bad habits.
Simon disagreed, arguing that families who receive between $20,000 and $40,000 a year, depending on the size of the basic income payments, would actually boost the country's prosperity.
"You give families that kind of money, it's all going back into the economy," he said. "It's not going into mutual funds. It's going right back into the economy."
There haven't been any major formal studies in developed countries to determine whether people who get a basic income would work less or use the money to buy things like drugs and alcohol. But studies in the developing world have suggested that when people receive cash transfers on a regular basis, they are most likely to spend the money on education, home repair, or starting or growing a business.
Research in these developing nations has also found that alcohol and tobacco use may decline with basic income, as some experts suspect the extra money alleviates stress and makes people less inclined to drink or smoke to cope with a negative situation.

Source: Business Insider.



Tuesday, October 3

Another Mass Shooting, Another Grab For Guns: 6 Gun Facts By Tony Cartalucci

Another Mass Shooting, Another Grab For Guns: 6 Gun Facts
By Tony Cartalucci

Concluding Thoughts 

"All 6  facts tell us that violence is driven by socioeconomic factors, not access to firearms. If firearms drove violence, the United States would be by far the most violent nation on Earth, followed by Serbia – they are not. The UK and Japan would have roughly the same rate of homicides – they do not.

If you truly care about a more peaceful world, address the root causes of violence – which is clearly, obviously not access to weapons. Those who intentionally stir hysteria and prey on the emotions of well-meaning people to push issues like gun control have ulterior motives – and coincidentally allow all of the actual factors that drive violence – socioeconomic disparity and destitution – to continue or even expand.

If you are truly against violence, you must truly commit yourself to understand what really causes it, and not indulge in emotional campaigns pursuing irrational measures that not only will not stop violence, but will invite great amounts of the very exploitation and injustice that drives violence." 
(...)

"Examining the heavily medicated, violent, and intentionally divided population of America and the socioeconomic doldrums they inhabit would be a good place to start.(emphasis mine)

read the whole article: here.



Monday, October 2

Thick eyebrow came to stay: Audrey was right





Finally! I never liked thin eyebrows and I've been plucking only those hairs that are far below the line for my entire life.
Last week I went to buy some lipsticks and the Maybelline seller did put a mascara on my eyebrows. (I'm not receiving money, it is not an ad but I buy some things of this brand because they are not expensive).
The result was great so I bought it.

I took a glimpse on the eyebrows trends and... surprise, surprise! My eyebrows are finally in fashion!

I found this beautiful picture of Audrey Hepburn. I had never noticed she had this beautiful eyebrows.